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Conclusions

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Abstract

In the four previous chapters we have described a large number of different mechanisms through which information technologies have influenced the pattern of globalization in developing countries. Our first task in this chapter is to draw together the conclusions we have reached in each of the four preceding chapters and by examining the interrelationships between these individual findings, to derive the final, cumulative results of the analysis.1 In the discussion thereafter, we seek to explain the major patterns that emerge from this exercise and to assess the extent to which they match the actual country variance around the average degree of globalization achieved by developing countries as described in Chapter 1. Finally, after setting our findings in the broader debate on globalization and development, we assess some of the specific policy issues to which they individually and collectively give rise.

Keywords

Information Technology Foreign Investment Skilled Labour Previous Chapter Innovation Capability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Jeffrey James 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tilburg UniversityThe Netherlands

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