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International Trade and Foreign Investment in Information Technology

Chapter
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Abstract

As already noted in Chapter 1, international trade in information technologies promotes globalization not only because it is growing rapidly, but more specifically, because it is growing at rates considerably faster than trade as a whole. To the extent that they can succesfully export these technologies international trade thus offers developing countries a major opportunity to become more integrated in the global economy. As we have defined it, however, globalization also refers to foreign investment and by the same logic it follows that the higher is the growth of this type of investment in information technologies, the more are developing countries afforded a further opportunity to intensity their connections with the international economy.1

Keywords

International Trade Foreign Investment Technological Capability Manufacture Export Major Exporter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Jeffrey James 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tilburg UniversityThe Netherlands

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