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Gender, Job Insecurity and the Work-Life Balance

  • Nickie Charles
  • Emma James
Part of the The Future of Work Series book series (TFW)

Abstract

Policy discussions of the work-life balance normally focus on the need to reconcile the demands of paid employment with family life and, particularly, childcare. The work-life balance so defined is often seen as a women’s issue which can be resolved by providing women with flexible hours of work. It is increasingly evident, however, that the work-life balance is something that concerns men as well as women and that there are men who value flexibility in paid work and want to spend more time with their children (Hatten et al., 2002; EOC, 2003; Guardian, 2/1/03). Indeed this is recognised in the legislation introduced in Britain in April 2003 which improves fathers’ as well as mothers’ rights to request flexibility at work. What the legislation does not do, however, is move away from the assumption that the work-life balance is about balancing paid work and unpaid care work.

Keywords

Family Life Unpaid Work Life Balance Provider Role Friendly Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Nickle Charles and Emma James 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nickie Charles
  • Emma James

There are no affiliations available

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