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Sex Differences in Work-Life Balance Goals

  • Catherine Hakim
Part of the The Future of Work Series book series (TFW)

Abstract

Are we heading for a unisex workplace in the future? Or will differences between men and women continue to shape their lifestyle choices and work histories? Answers to these questions matter, because they inform, explicitly or implicitly, perspectives on work—life balance, the employment policies of central governments, and the personnel policies of employers. This chapter argues that differences between men and women in work orientations will persist to some extent in the 21st century — in their attitudes, values, life goals and behaviour. Policy-makers should recognise and accept this fact, and devise realistic, evidence-based policies, rather than relying on wishful thinking to develop utopian unisex policies that will necessarily fail.

Keywords

Labour Market Family Model Gender Ideology Preference Theory Work Orientation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Catherine Hakim 2005

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  • Catherine Hakim

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