Advertisement

The Colonial Conquest of Zambia

Chapter
  • 31 Downloads

Abstract

White supremacy, firmly entrenched in Southern Africa by the end of the nineteenth century, was conspicuous in the British war of 1899–1902 against the Boer Republics. Both sides refrained from recruiting blacks to fight their battles. They participated, if at all, only as non-combatants. Africans took advantage of the breakdown of social controls to ignore taxes, forced labour and other exactions, but for the most part continued to work on farms whose owners were away on commando. British troops burnt farms and crowded the occupants into concentration camps which, at the end of the war, had 200 000 inmates, including 80 000 Africans segregated in separate camps (Walker, 1964: 498).

Keywords

African National Congress White Supremacy Copper Price Colonial Authority White Miner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Barnes, J.A., Politics in a Changing Sociey. A Political History of the Fort Jameson Ngoni (Manchester University Press for The Institute for Social Research. Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1967).Google Scholar
  2. Berger, Elena L., Labour, Race and Colonial Rule. The Copperbelt from 1924 to Independence (London: Oxford University Press, 1974).Google Scholar
  3. Brown, Richard, ‘Anthropology and Colonial Rule. The Case of Godfrey Wilson and the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute, Northern Rhodesia’, in Talal Asad (ed.), Anthropology and the Colonial Encounter (London: Ithaca Press, 1975), pp. 173–97.Google Scholar
  4. Burawoy, Michael, The Colour of Class on the Copper Mines. From African Advancement to Zambianization, Zambian Papers No. 7 (Manchester University Press for The Institute for African Studies, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1972).Google Scholar
  5. Colson, E. and M. Gluckman (eds.), Seven Tribes of Central Africa (Manchester: Manchester University Press for the Institute of Social Research, University of Zambia, 1959; repr. 1968). (First published by Oxford University Press, 1951, as Seven Tribes of Central British Africa.)Google Scholar
  6. Colson, Elizabeth, The Social Consequences of Resettlement. The Impact of the Kariba Resettlement upon the Gwembe Tonga (Manchester University Press for The Institute for African Studies. Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1971).Google Scholar
  7. Colson, Elizabeth, ‘The Institute under Max Gluckman, 1942–47’ and ‘From Livingstone to Lusaka, 1948–51’, in Mubanga E. Kashoki et al. (eds), African Social Research, The Journal of The Institute for African Studies (Manchester University Press for The Institute for African Studies, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1977), pp. 285–95 and 295–307.Google Scholar
  8. Cunnison, Ian, The Luapula Peoples of Northern Rhodesia. Custom and History in Tribal Politics (Manchester University Press for The Institute for Social Research, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1959).Google Scholar
  9. Davidson, Apollon, Cecil Rhodes and his Time, trans. C. English (Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1988).Google Scholar
  10. Davis, J. Merle (ed.), Modern Industry and the African. An Enquiry into the Effect of the Copper Mines of Central Africa upon Native Society and the Work of Christian Missions made under the auspices of the Department of Social and Industrial Research of the International Missionary Council (London: Macmillan, 1933).Google Scholar
  11. Epstein, A.L., Politics in an Urban African Community (Manchester University Press for the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute, Northern Rhodesia, 1958).Google Scholar
  12. Garth, H.H. and Mills, C.W. (eds), From Max Weber. Essays in Sociology (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1948).Google Scholar
  13. Gluckman, Max, ‘The Lozi of Barotseland in North-West Rhodesia’, in E. Colson and M. Gluckman (eds), Seven Tribes of Central Africa (Manchester University Press for Institute for Social Research, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1961).Google Scholar
  14. Hailey, Lord, An African Survey Revised 1956. A Study of Problems arising in Africa South of the Sahara (London: Oxford University Press, 1957).Google Scholar
  15. International Labour Office, Basic Needs in an Economy under Pressure. Findings and Recommendations of an ILO/JASPA Basic Needs Mission to,Zambia (Job Skills Programme for Africa, Addis Ababa, 1981).Google Scholar
  16. Kashoki, Mubanga E. et al. (eds), African Social Research (Formerly The Rhodes-Livingstone Journal), Human Problems in Central Africa, Anniversary Issue No. 24 (Manchester University Press for The Institute for African Studies, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1977).Google Scholar
  17. Long, Norman, Social Change and the Individual. A Study of the Social and Religious Responses to Innovation in a Zambian Rural Community (Manchester University Press for The Institute for Social Research, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1968).Google Scholar
  18. Lungu, G.F., Administrative Decentralization in the Zambia Bureaucracy. An Analysis of Environmental Constraints, Zambian Paper No. 18. Institute for African Studies, African Social Research (Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1985).Google Scholar
  19. Meebelo, Henry S., Reaction to Colonialism. A Prelude to the Politics of Independence in Northern Zambia 1893–1939 (Manchester University Press for The Institute for African Studies, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1971).Google Scholar
  20. Mulford, David C., Zambia. The Politics of Independence 1957–1964 (London: Oxford University Press, 1967).Google Scholar
  21. Mushindo, Reverend Paul Bwembya, The Life of a Zambian Evangelist; the reminiscences, with an Editorial Foreword by J. van Velsen and a Note by Fergus Macpherson, Communication No. 9 (Institute for African Studies, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1973).Google Scholar
  22. Mwanakatwe, J.M., The Growth of Education in Zambia since Independence (Lusaka: Oxford University Press, 1968).Google Scholar
  23. Oakes, Dougie (ed.), Reader’s Digest Illustrated History of South Africa. The Real Story (Cape Town: The Reader’s Digest Association of South Africa, 1988).Google Scholar
  24. Orner-Cooper, John, The Zulu Aftermath. A Nineteenth-Century Revolution in Bantu Africa (London: Longmans, Green, 1966).Google Scholar
  25. Perrings, Charles, ‘Consciousness, Conflict and Proletarianization: An Asscssent of the 1935 Mineworkers’ Strike on the Northern Rhodesian Copperbelt’, journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 4, no. 1, 1977, pp. 31–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Pim, Sir Alan and Milligan, S., Report of the Commission Appointed to Enquire into the Financial and Economic Position of Northern Rhodesia. Colonial No. 145 (London: H.M. Stationery Office, 1938).Google Scholar
  27. Praia, Sir Ronald, ‘African Advancement on the Copperbelt’, African Affairs, journal of the Royal African Society, vol. liii, 1954.Google Scholar
  28. Richards, Audrey, ‘The Rhodes-Livingstone Institute: An Experiment in Research, 1933–38’, in African Social Research, no. 24 (Manchester University Press for The Institute for African Studies, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1977).Google Scholar
  29. Roberts, Andrew, A History of Zambia (London: Heinemann Educational Books, 1976).Google Scholar
  30. Ross, Rev. Andrew C., ‘The African — A Child or a Man. The Quarrel between the Blantyre Mission of the Church of Scotland and the British Central Africa Administration 1890–1905’, in E. Stokes and R. Brown (eds), The Zambian Past. Studies in Central African History (Manchester University Press for The Institute for Social Research. Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1966).Google Scholar
  31. Rotberg, Robert I., Christian Missionaries and the Creation of Northern Rhodesia 1880–1924 (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1965).Google Scholar
  32. Saffrey, A. Lynn, A Report on Some Aspects of African Living Conditions on the Gopperbelt of Northern Rhodesia (Lusaka, 1943).Google Scholar
  33. Scudder, Thayer, Kariba Studies. Volume 11, Tice Ecology of the Gwembe Tonga (Manchester University Press for the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute Northern Rhodesia, Manchester: University Press, 1962).Google Scholar
  34. Simons, H. J., ‘Customary Unions in a Changing Society’, reprinted from Acta juridica (University of Cape Town, Balkema, 1958).Google Scholar
  35. Simons, H. J., ‘Prologue’ in African Social Research (Manchester University Press for the Institute for African Studies, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1977), pp. 259–73.Google Scholar
  36. Simons, HJ., ‘Zambia’s Urban Situation’, in H. Jack Simons et al., Slums or Self-Reliance? Urban Growth in Zambia, Communication No. 12 (The Institute for African Studies, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1976), pp. 1–32.Google Scholar
  37. Simons, HJ., ‘The Institute under Max Gluckman, 1942–47’ and ’From Livingstone to Lusaka, 1948–51’, in Mubanga E. Kashoki et al. (eds), African Social Research, The journal of The Institute for African Studies (Manchester University Press for The Institute for African Studies. Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1977), pp. 285–95 and 295–307.Google Scholar
  38. Simons, KJ., ‘Zambia’s Urban Situation’, in Ben Turok (ed.), Development in Zambia: A Reader (London: ZED Press, 1979), pp. 1–25.Google Scholar
  39. Simons, J. and Simons R.E., One Hundred Years of job Reservation on the South African Mines (International Migration for Employment Working Paper, Geneva, International Labour Office, 1987).Google Scholar
  40. Thompson, Leonard, ‘The Forgotten Factor in Southern African History’, in Leonard Thompson (ed.), African Societies in Southern Africa (London: Heinemann Educational Books, 1969), pp. 1–23.Google Scholar
  41. Tordoff, W. (eds.), Politics in Zambia (Manchester: Manchester University Press/Lusaka, distributed by the Institute for African Studies, University of Zambia, 1974).Google Scholar
  42. Turok, B. (ed.), Development in Zambia: A Reader (London: Zed Books, 1979).Google Scholar
  43. Turner, V.W., Schism and Continuity in an African Society. A Study of Ndembu Village Life (Manchester University Press for The Institute for Social Research, Lusaka, University of Zambia, 1957).Google Scholar
  44. van Binsbergen, Wim MJ., Religious Change in Zambia Exploratory Studies, Academisch Proefschrift, Vrye Universiteit te Amsterdam (Harlem: In de Knipscheer, 1979).Google Scholar
  45. Walker, Eric A., A History of Southern Africa (London: Longmans Green, 1964).Google Scholar
  46. Watson, William, Tribal Cohesion in a Money Economy. A Study of the Mambwe People of Northern Rhodesia (Manchester University Press for The Rhodes-Livingstone Institute, Northern Rhodesia, Manchester: University Press, 1958).Google Scholar
  47. Wilson, Godfrey, Essay on the Economies of Detribalisation in Northern Rhodesia, Rhodes-Livingstone Papers, 5 and 6 (Northern Rhodesia, 1941–2).Google Scholar
  48. Wilson, Monica, ‘The First Three Years, 1938–41’, in African Social Research, Anniversary Issue (Manchester University Press for The Institute for African Studies, Manchester: University Press, 1977), pp. 279–83.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Ray Alexander Simon 1997

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations