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Physical Training, Ethical Discipline, and Creative Violence: Zones of Self-Mastery in the Hindu Nationalist Movement

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Abstract

Hindu nationalist parties, organizations, and institutions built on the interventions of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) in Ahmedabad just after Independence. Hindu nationalist leaders were able to rehabilitate the reputation of the movement through their participation in the Mahagujarat Movement which agitated for the formation of an autonomous state of Gujarat. In the 1958–1960 period, they collaborated with the Gujarati Marxist, Indulal Yagnik, to contribute to the formation of an autonomous state of Gujarat. Members of the Jana Sangh in particular were able to be associated with Yagnik, who was a reputed leader (if also considered eccentric), and undertake satyagraha for a cause that was undertaken in the name of all Gujaratis. The 1965 war with Pakistan, over its attempt to claim part of Kutch, also strengthened the hand of Hindu nationalists not only because the Chief Minister’s plane was shot down during the event, which caused much outrage among Gujarati Hindus, but also because the event brought to the surface suspicions of Pakistan and therefore of Muslims in Ahmedabad also.

Keywords

Physical Training Ethical Orientation Affirmative Action Policy Physical Culture Critical Sensibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Arafaat A. Valiani 2011

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