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Militant Peacekeeping and Subterfugic Violence of the Quit India Movement (1942)

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Abstract

In 1928, the Bardoli Satyagraha was hailed a success and it delivered a long-awaited affirmation of the methods of nonviolent political mobilization that Gandhi and nationalist leaders close to him endorsed. As demonstrated in the previous chapter, “winning” the grievance by means of organized nonviolent protest issued a powerful rebuttal to Gandhi’s opponents, particularly those who rejected his nonviolent program. The success in Bardoli confirmed that the Gandhian movement had the potential to form a genuinely popular nationalist movement, based on nonviolent principles and practices, while also pose a formidable challenge to colonial rule. To be sure, the events in 1928 transformed the category of satyagraha into a moniker of popular protest within India and abroad and this particular symbol of popular non-violent resistance possessed markedly disciplinary qualities. As outlined in previous chapters, Gandhi and Gandhian leaders framed satyagraha as both a moral way of life and a sophisticated method of organizing popular resistance to the state. Relevant to both dimensions, the Gandhians emphasized the necessity for rank-and-file activists to undertake routines of physical culture all the while maintaining a commitment to nonviolent conduct and agitation. Such physical forms of preparation enabled them draw upon and deploy tactics from a repertoire of effective protest techniques.

Keywords

Communal Violence Civil Disobedience Socialist Party Nationalist Movement Congress Party 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Arafaat A. Valiani 2011

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