Advertisement

‘Pro-Poor’ Growth and Children in Developing Countries: The Case of Vietnam

  • Paul Glewwe
Part of the Palgrave Studies on Children and Development book series (PSCD)

Abstract

Economists often claim that economic growth in developing countries leads to a better quality of life for virtually everyone in those countries. Presumably this claim includes children as well as adults. The extent to which economic growth improves children’s welfare may depend on the nature of that growth. This has led some economists to investigate ‘pro-poor growth’, that is, economic growth that is particularly favourable to the well-being of poor people, including children.

Keywords

Child Welfare Poor People Government Spending Child Labour School Enrolment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Chenery, Hollis, Montek Ahluwalia, Clive Bell, John Duloy and Richard Jolly (1974) Redistribution with Growth, Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Cuong, Nguyen Viet (2008) ‘Is a Governmental Micro-Credit Program for the Poor Really Pro-Poor? Evidence from Viet Nam’, The Developing Economies 46.2: 151–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Deaton, Angus (2007) ‘Global Patterns of Income and Health: Facts, Interpretations, and Policies’, WIDER Annual Lecture 10, UNU-WIDER, Helsinki, 29 September 2007.Google Scholar
  4. Deaton, Angus, and Margaret Grosh (2000) ‘Consumption’ in M. Grosh and P. Glewwe (eds) Designing Household Survey Questionnaires for Developing Countries: Lessons from 15 Years of the Living Standards Measurement Study, Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Dollar, David, and Aart Kraay (2002) ‘Growth is Good for the Poor’, Journal of Economic Growth 7.3: 195–225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Edmonds, Eric (2005) ‘Does Child Labour Decline with Improving Economic Status?’, Journal of Human Resources 40.1: 77–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Edmonds, Eric (2008) ‘Child Labour’ in T.P. Schultz and J. Strauss (eds) Handbook of Development Economics, vol. 4, Oxford and Amsterdam: North-Holland.Google Scholar
  8. Fishlow, Albert (1980) ‘Who Benefits from Economic Development? Comment’, American Economic Review 70.1: 250–56.Google Scholar
  9. Ferreira, Francisco, and Norbert Schady (2008) ‘Aggregate Economic Shocks, Child Schooling, and Child Health’, World Bank Research Observer 24.2: 147–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. General Statistics Office (2007) Result of the Viet Nam Household Living Standards Survey2006, Hanoi: Statistical Publishing House.Google Scholar
  11. Glewwe, Paul (2004) ‘An Investigation of the Determinants of School Progress and Academic Achievement in Vietnam’ in P. Glewwe, N. Agrawal and D. Dollar (eds) Economic Growth, Poverty and Household Welfare in Vietnam, Washington DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  12. Glewwe, Paul, and Hai-Anh Dang (2011) ‘Was Vietnam’s Economic Growth in the 1990s Pro-Poor? An Analysis of Panel Data from Vietnam’, Economic Development and Cultural Change 59.3: 588–608.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Glewwe, Paul, and Hanan Jacoby (2004) ‘Economic Growth and the Demand for Education: Is There a Wealth Effect?’ Journal of Development Economics 74.1: 33–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Glewwe, Paul, Stefanie Koch and Bui Linh Nguyen (2004) ‘Child Nutrition, Economic Growth, and the Provision of Health Care Services in Vietnam’ in P. Glewwe, N. Agrawal and D. Dollar (eds) Economic Growth, Poverty and Household Welfare in Vietnam, Washington DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  15. Glewwe, Paul, and Edward Miguel (2008) ‘The Impact of Child Health and Nutrition on Education in Less Developed Countries’ in T.P. Schultz and J. Strauss (eds) Handbook of Development Economics, vol. 4, Oxford and Amsterdam: North-Holland.Google Scholar
  16. King, Elizabeth, and Andrew Mason (2001) Engendering Development through Gender Equality in Rights, Resources and Voice, Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. O’Donnell, O., E. van Doorslaer, R.P. Rannan-Eliya, A. Somanathan, S.R. Adhikari, D. Harbianto, C.G. Garg, P. Hanvoravongchai, M.N. Huq, A. Karan, G.M. Leung, C.-w. Ng, B.R. Pande, K. Tin, L. Trisnantoro, C. Vasavid, Y. Zhang and Y. Zhao (2007) ‘The Incidence of Public Spending on Healthcare: Comparative Evidence from Asia’, World Bank Economic Review 21.1: 93–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Orazem, Peter, and Elizabeth King (2008) ‘Schooling in Developing Countries: The Roles of Supply, Demand, and Government Policy’ in T.P. Schultz and J. Strauss (eds) Handbook of Development Economics, vol. 4, Oxford and Amsterdam: North-Holland.Google Scholar
  19. Ravallion, Martin (1995) ‘Growth and Poverty: Evidence for Developing Countries in the 1980s’, Economics Letters 48.3–4: 411–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Ravallion, Martin (2004) Pro-Poor Growth: A Primer, Policy Research Working Paper 3242, Washington DC: World Bank.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Strauss, John, and Duncan Thomas (2008) ‘Health over the Life Course’, in T.P. Schultz and J. Strauss (eds) Handbook of Development Economics, Volume4, Oxford and Amsterdam: North-Holland.Google Scholar
  22. van de Walle, Dominique (2004) ‘The Static and Dynamic Incidence of Vietnam’s Public Safety Net’ in P. Glewwe, N. Agrawal and D. Dollar (eds), Economic Growth, Poverty and Household Welfare in Vietnam, Washington DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  23. Wagstaff, Adam, and Nga Nguyet Nguyen (2004) ‘Poverty and Survival Prospects of Vietnamese Children under Doi Moi’ in P. Glewwe, N. Agrawal and D. Dollar (eds) Economic Growth, Poverty and Household Welfare in Vietnam, Washington DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  24. World Bank (1998) 1998 World Development Indicators, Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  25. World Bank (2008) 2008 World Development Indicators, Washington, DC: World Bank.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Paul Glewwe 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Glewwe

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations