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Outward Bound, Tangled Nightmares: Rereading Globalization in Contemporary Nigeria

  • Olutayo Charles Adesina
Part of the Frontiers of Globalization Series book series (FOG)

Abstract

Developments in the global economy since the 1980s have made significant inroads into the Third World. These have inevitably influenced the direction and extent of economic growth and social change in several developing countries. Thus, while the global flows of ideas, doctrines, philosophies and peoples have become central to any discussion of globalization and its inequalities, it is appropriate to note that some of the ideas and policies adopted in the wake of global flows have wrought a fundamental disequilibrium in the economy and societies of many developing countries. Unfortunately, all too often, developing countries have failed to grasp the peculiar nature of their economies, particularly the transmission mechanism of major macroeconomic variables (Ajayi 1989, p. 3).

Keywords

Foreign Exchange Urban Management Global Flow Structural Adjustment Program Term Debt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Olutayo Charles Adesina 2011

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  • Olutayo Charles Adesina

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