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International Assignments and Global Roles: Working Abroad

  • Ines Wichert

Abstract

Nothing prepares a leader for running a global organization quite as well as having spent some time abroad to personally experience the difficulties of executing projects and delivering results in a different culture. As we saw in Chapter 1, the lack of international experience has been mentioned as a reason for women not progressing to senior roles.

Keywords

International Experience Virtual Team Patriarchal Society Male Colleague Local Team 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Ines Wichert 2011

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  • Ines Wichert

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