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The Human Subject in International Studies: An Outline for Interdisciplinary Research Programmes

  • Pami Aalto
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in International Relations Series book series (PSIR)

Abstract

In this chapter I will explore the research directions amenable for making the ‘human subject’ an integral part of the wide and plural field of interdisciplinary international studies (IS). I will ask what options open up if and when we examine the various aspects of the ‘international’ from the point of view of the human subject.

Keywords

Human Subject Foreign Policy International Relation Prospect Theory World Politics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Pami Aalto 2011

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  • Pami Aalto

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