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Baartman and the Private: How Can We Look at a Figure that Has Been Looked at Too Much?

Chapter

Abstract

The burial of Sara Baartman’s remains on August 9, 2002 in Hankey in the Eastern Cape, near where she was born, was a signal event in South African and world history. The story of Baartman’s life has often been recounted, yet below I consider a little discussed aspect of the negotiations over the return of her remains from France and propose a theory of the private based on an analysis of Baartman’s life and her contemporary meanings.

Keywords

Black Woman African American Woman African History Female Slave Contemporary Meaning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 3.
    Clifton Crais and Pamela Scully, Sara Baartman and the “Hottentot Venus” A Ghost Story and a Biography (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009), 80.Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    Gould, Stephen Jay, The Flamingo’s Smile: Reflections in Natural History (New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1985), 296.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    Colette Colligan, “Anti-Abolition Writes Obscenity: The English Vice, Transatlantic Slavery, and England’s Obscene Print Culture,” International Exposure: Perspectives on Modern European Pornography, 1800–2000 (Piscataway, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2005), 76.Google Scholar
  4. 8.
    Clifton Crais and Pamela Scully, Sara Baartman and the Hottentot Venus: A Ghost Story and a Biography (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009), 12.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Natasha Gordon-Chipembere 2011

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