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Nanotechnology

  • Nayef R. F. Al-Rodhan
Part of the St Antony’s Series book series

Abstract

Nanotechnology is a ‘fundamental enabling technology’: the science of engineering objects that are less than one micrometer in size.1 Even though, or precisely because, nanotech products are infinitesimally small, the potential for revolutionary discoveries and innovations in this field is enormous. As William Sims Bainbridge has put it, nanotechnology is a ‘region where many technologies meet, combine, and creatively generate a world of possibilities’.2 An interdisciplinary science involving disciplines such as physics, robotics, chemistry, biology, and electrical and mechanical engineering,3 nanotechnology already strongly influences fields as diverse as medicine, energy and the environment. It is expected to have an even deeper impact across additional realms of science, technology and society in the future.

Keywords

International Energy Agency Nanotechnology Research National Nanotechnology Initiative Strategic Technology Nanotechnology Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Nayef R.F. Al-Rodhan 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nayef R. F. Al-Rodhan
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.St Antony’s CollegeOxford UniversityUK
  2. 2.Geneva Centre for Security PolicyGenevaSwitzerland

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