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Health Care

  • Nayef R. F. Al-Rodhan
Part of the St Antony’s Series book series

Abstract

When it comes to the geopolitics of health, today’s developments in strategic technologies present both challenges and opportunities. Improvements and breakthroughs in pharmaceuticals, medical devices, vaccines and patient care have meant improved standards of living and longer life expectancy for much of the world. In certain parts of the world, many infectious diseases have been contained or eliminated, and improvements in sanitation and food safety have reduced the spread of common illnesses, especially in poorer, developing countries.

Keywords

Global Fund Global Public Health World Economic Forum Global Public Good Health Care Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Nayef R.F. Al-Rodhan 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nayef R. F. Al-Rodhan
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.St Antony’s CollegeOxford UniversityUK
  2. 2.Geneva Centre for Security PolicyGenevaSwitzerland

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