Advertisement

East Asian Pop Culture

  • Chua Beng Huat

Abstract

The American labour historian Gary Cross argues that ‘consumerism is not an inevitable stage in industrial development. Rather it has been a choice made within complex cultural, political and social contexts’ (1993: vii). Furthermore, ‘increased consumer need would lash workers ever more firmly to their jobs’ (Cross 1993: 39). The consequent ‘work-and-spend’ culture has become an essential part of contemporary everyday life of all wage earners, for whom the constant expansion of consumption remains the primary reason to labour. Historically, American capitalists had invested earlier than anyone else in consumer culture, including mass entertainment, which explains the American domination in the world of mass consumption, from fast food to Hollywood. Since the 1960s, East Asian countries have experienced very rapid and compressed capitalist industrialization leading to the unprecedented expansion of all modes of consumption, from small objects to luxurious automobiles to mass entertainment (Chua 2009). Against the background of the global dominance of the American mass-entertainment pop culture industry, a regional pop culture industry has been developing and consolidating in East Asia, so much so that we can discursively designate this transnational regional cultural industry as the ‘East Asian Pop Culture’ industry.2

Keywords

Chinese Language Soft Power Television Drama Drama Series John Benjamin Publishing Company 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Agost, R. (2004) ‘Translation in Bilingual Contexts: Different Norms in Dubbing Translation’, in P. Orero (ed.), Topics in Audiovisual Translation. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, pp. 63–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Chua, B.H. (2001) ‘Pop Culture China’, Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, 22(2), 113–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chua, B.H. (2006a) ‘Gossip About Stars: Newspaper and Pop Culture China’, in W. Sun (ed.), Media and the Chinese Diaspora: Community, Communication and Commerce. London: Routledge, pp. 75–90.Google Scholar
  4. Chua, B.H. (2006b) ‘East Asian Pop Culture: Consumer Communities and Politics of the National’, Studies of Broadcasting Culture (Seoul), 18(1), 89–114.Google Scholar
  5. Chua, B.H. (2008) ‘Structure of Identification and Distancing in Watching East Asian Television Drama’, in B.H. Chua and K. Iwabuchi (eds), East Asian Pop Culture: Analysing the Korean Wave. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 73–89.Google Scholar
  6. Chua, B.H. (2009) ‘From Small Objects to Cars: Consumption Expansion in East Asia’, in H. Lange and L. Meier (eds), The New Middle Class: Globalizing Lifestyles, Consumerism and Environmental Concern. Heidelberg: Springer, pp. 101–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Chun, A. (1996) ‘Fuck Chineseness: On the Ambiguities of Ethnicity as Culture as Identity’, Boundary 2, 23(2), 111–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cross, G. (1993) Time and Money: The Making of Consumer Culture. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Fu, P. (ed.) (2008) China Forever: The Shaw Brothers and Diasporic Cinema. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.Google Scholar
  10. Hall, S. (1981) ‘Notes on Deconstructing “the Popular”’, in R. Samuel (ed.), People’s History and Socialist Theory. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  11. Han, S.-M. (2000) ‘Consuming the Modern: Globalization, Things Japanese and the Politics of Cultural Identity in Korea’, Journal of Pacific Asia, 6, 7–26.Google Scholar
  12. Hirata, Y. (2008) ‘Touring “Dramatic Korea”: Japanese Women as Hanryu Dramas and Tourists on Hanryu Tours’, in B.H. Chua and K. Iwabuchi (eds), East Asian Pop Culture: Analysing the Korean Wave. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 143–56.Google Scholar
  13. Hu, K. (2003) ‘The Power of Circulation: Digital Technologies and the Online Chinese Fans of Japanese TV Drama’, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 6, 171–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Iwabuchi, K. (2004) ‘Time and the Neighbour: Japanese Media Consumption of Asia in the 1990s’, in K. Iwabuchi, S. Muecke and M. Thomas (eds), Rogue Flows: Trans-Asian Cultural Traffic. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 151–74.Google Scholar
  15. Kim, H.-M. (2002) ‘The Inflow of Japanese Culture and the Historical Construction of Fandom in South Korea’, paper presented at the International Conference on Culture in the Age of Informatization: East Asia in the 21st Century, Institute of East and West Studies, Yonsei University, 16 November.Google Scholar
  16. Khoo, O. (2006) ‘Slang Images: On the “Foreignness” of Contemporary Singaporean Films’, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 7(1), 81–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Ko, Y. (2004) ‘The Desired Form: Japanese Idol Dramas in Taiwan’, in K. Iwabuchi (ed.), Feeling Asian Modernities. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 107–28.Google Scholar
  18. Lee, G. (2009) ‘A Soft Power Approach to the “Korean Wave”’, paper presented at the Korean-ASEAN Academic Conference on Pop Culture Formations across East Asia in the 21st Century: Hybridization or Asianization, 1–4 February, Burapha University, Thailand.Google Scholar
  19. Lee, M.-t. (2004) ‘Travelling with Japanese TV Dramas: Cross-Cultural Orientation and Flowing Identification of Contemporary Taiwanese Youth’, in K. Iwabuchi (ed.), Feeling Asian Modernities. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 129–54.Google Scholar
  20. Leung, L. (2008) ‘Mediating Nationalism and Modernity: The Transnationalization of Korean Drama on Chinese (Satellite) TV’, in B.H. Chua and K. Iwabuchi (eds), East Asian Pop Culture. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 53–69.Google Scholar
  21. MacLachlan, E. and Chua, G.-l. (2004) ‘Defining Asian Femininity: Chinese Viewers of Japanese TV Dramas in Singapore’, in K. Iwabuchi (ed.), Feeling Asian Modernities. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 155–76.Google Scholar
  22. Martinez, X. (2004) ‘Film Dubbing, Its Process and Translation’, in P. Orero (ed.), Topics in Audiovisual Translation. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, pp. 3–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Menkhoff, T. and Gerke, S. (eds) (2002) Chinese Entrepreneurship and Asian Business Networks. London: RoutledgeCurzon.Google Scholar
  24. Mori, Y. (2008) ‘“Winter Sonata” and Cultural Practices of Active Fans in Japan: Considering Middle-Aged Women as Cultural Agents’, in B.H. Chua and K. Iwabuchi (eds), East Asian Pop Culture: Analysing the Korean Wave. London: Routledge, pp. 127–42.Google Scholar
  25. Moskowitz, M.L. (2009) Cries of Joy, Songs of Sorrow: Chinese Pop Music and its Cultural Connotations. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar
  26. Su, Y.L. (1999) ‘Romance Fiction and the Imaginary Reality: Reading Japanese Trendy Drama Socially’, unpublished MA thesis, Graduate Institute of Mass Communication, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan.Google Scholar
  27. Thomas, M. (2004), ‘East Asian Cultural Traces in Post-Socialist Vietnam’, in K. Iwabuchi, S. Muecke and M. Thomas (eds), Rogue Flows: Trans-Asian Cultural Traffic. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 177–95.Google Scholar
  28. Tu, W. (1991) ‘Culture China: The Periphery as the Centre’, Daedulus, 120, 1–32.Google Scholar
  29. Varela, F.C. (2004) ‘Synchronization in Dubbing’, in P. Orero (ed.), Topics in Audiovisual Translation. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, pp. 35–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Xu, M. (2009) ‘Chinese TV Drama in a Regional Market — Aspiring to be a Leading Cultural Actor?’, paper presented at the International Workshop on Pop Culture China, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore, 8–9 December.Google Scholar
  31. Yang, I. F.-c. (2008) ‘Rap(p)ing Korean Wave: National Identity in Question’, in B.H. Chua and K. Iwabuchi (eds), East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. Hong Kong University Press, pp. 191–216.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Chua Beng Huat 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chua Beng Huat

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations