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Introduction

  • Felicia Chan
  • Angelina Karpovich

Abstract

The study of genre in film and television has always had two histories: first, in the history of production, in which genres become effective means by which audience preferences may be identified, shaped and catered to; and, secondly, in the academic study of genres as textual devices capable of conveying meaning. The industrial-capitalist nature of both film and television offers the study of genre, a system of classification derived from literary criticism, with considerable potential for reading. On the one hand, it could be said that production creates genres and scholars study them; on the other hand, the discourse of genre that the scholarship produces can inform audiences, provoke debate and generate ideas, thus stimulating subsequent production.

Keywords

Film Production Screen Medium Horror Film Genre Theory Television Genre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Felicia Chan, Angelina Karpovich and Xin Zhang 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Felicia Chan
  • Angelina Karpovich

There are no affiliations available

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