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Literature and Clinical Education

  • Charley Baker
  • Paul Crawford
  • B. J. Brown
  • Maurice Lipsedge
  • Ronald Carter
Chapter
  • 130 Downloads

Abstract

This passage comes from Patrick McGrath’s recent novel Trauma, and it seems appropriate to begin our concluding chapter with a quote from a fictional psychiatrist (Charlie Weir) who is willing to confess that the processes of psychiatry involve much ‘art’ — a view that goes against the increasingly dominant, biomedical models of madness. We take issue with the bluff Dr Nash in Stanley and the Women, Kingsley Amis’ 1984 novel, who describes madness as an ‘artistic desert. Nothing of any general interest can be said about it’ (p. 185). Nash continues: ‘A fellow wants to put some madness into his novel because it is strange and frightening and quite popular. But if he bothers to go into the reality he finds it’s largely unsuitable, an unsuitable topic for his purposes’ (p. 185). Throughout this book, we have suggested that madness literature in fact has much of value, both for the literary world and for clinicians, and additionally for carers and people who experience madness themselves.

Keywords

Health Humanity General Medical Council Mute Patient Autobiographical Narrative Boundary Violation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Charlotte Baker, Paul Crawford, B. J. Brown, Maurice Lipsedge and Ronald Carter 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charley Baker
    • 1
  • Paul Crawford
    • 1
  • B. J. Brown
  • Maurice Lipsedge
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ronald Carter
    • 1
  1. 1.University of NottinghamUK
  2. 2.South London and Maudsley NHS TrustUK
  3. 3.Department of Psychological MedicineGuys Kings and St Thomas’s School of MedicineUK

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