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Towards Activation? Social Assistance Reforms and Discourses

  • Andreas Aust
  • Ana Arriba

Abstract

Since the 1970s the traditional pillars of social inclusion policy have been undermined. Unemployment has risen virtually everywhere, the transition from an industrial to a service sector economy has led to more flexible employment patterns and the individualisation of life-courses led to more uncertain family lives, transforming the traditional reliance of women and children on a male breadwinner. These structural changes generated new social risks that traditional welfare states met partially or not at all (Esping-Andersen, 1999; Esping-Andersen et al, 2002; Taylor-Gooby 2004a). Accordingly, social assistance claims have risen, and in most West European countries the reform of social assistance schemes has become a key issue in policy discourse.

Keywords

Welfare State Social Exclusion Social Inclusion Social Assistance Labour Market Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Andreas Aust & Ana Arriba 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Aust
  • Ana Arriba

There are no affiliations available

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