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Race, Crime and Criminal Justice in Australia and New Zealand

  • Greg Newbold
  • Samantha Jeffries
Chapter

Abstract

Although they are only 2,000 kilometres apart and were briefly governed as a single entity (1840–1842), Australia and New Zealand have now been politically independent for over 160 years. To outsiders the speech patterns, sporting interests and cultural values of Australians and New Zealanders make them appear quite similar but closer examination reveals considerable differences. This is reflected not only in their disparate histories, but also in their modern political systems, their population sizes and make-up and their treatment of native peoples. Crime profiles of both minority and majority ethnic groups are manifested in these differences as well as in the criminal justice systems of the two countries.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Indigenous People Child Sexual Assault Criminal Justice System Australian Bureau 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Greg Newbold and Samantha Jeffries 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Greg Newbold
    • 1
  • Samantha Jeffries
    • 2
  1. 1.University of CanterburyNew Zealand
  2. 2.Queensland University of TechnologyAustralia

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