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Race, Crime and Criminal Justice in Germany

  • Hans-Jörg Albrecht
Chapter
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Abstract

In Germany, as in other countries of continental Europe, race is not a category which is used in political and scientific discourses on crime, victimization and criminal justice. In accounts on crime and criminal justice it is rather immigration and its links to crime, criminal justice and criminal victimization which continue to receive widespread attention. The topic ‘immigration and crime’ figures prominently in German internal and European Union politics and has an increasing impacts on election campaigns, which emphasize crime control and security. Recently, in addition to demands to strengthen criminal law, strict immigration control and the effective enforcement of deportation orders and requests for better integration policies are voiced. The social integration of immigrants has become a particularly salient and ambiguous issue in political and public debates as deficits in social integration are perceived to be the root cause of an outstanding crime problem among groups of young immigrants. In Germany (and elsewhere in Europe), the process of immigration has so far led to the re-emergence of cultural, ethnic and religious divides in society and, ultimately, has triggered the question of how social and political integration can be achieved under conditions of ethnic and religious diversity. An ongoing discussion on the rise of a “parallel society” (Halm and Sauer 2006)1 points in particular at Muslim immigrants who are sometimes criticized for their apparent refusal to integrate with mainstream society.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Violent Crime Immigrant Group Asylum Seeker Hate Crime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Hans-Jörg Albrecht 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans-Jörg Albrecht
    • 1
  1. 1.Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal LawFreiburgGermany

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