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Searching for the Contemporary in the Traditional: Contemporary Indonesian Dance in Southeast Asia

  • Sal Murgiyanto
Part of the Performance Interventions book series (PIPI)

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is on the relationship between the ‘contemporary’ and the ‘traditional’ in the way dance is approached in Indonesia -and indeed, in a number of Southeast Asian contexts. This ‘approach’ is itself a form of research. Two facts are of particular salience here. First, in Indonesia, most choreographers are trained in traditional dance. There are some choreographers who are trained in Western forms such as ballet and modern dance, but they are in the minority. Second, it is worthwhile noting that there is no single Indonesian culture. The country consists of many ethnic cultures, and therein lies one of Indonesia’s strengths -its possession of a rich and diverse variety of traditional artistic forms. Despite these two facts, Indonesian choreographers are interested in contemporary dance, but this orientation is distinct in that it does not forgo traditional values and the traditional dance forms.

Keywords

Collaborative Work Southeast Asian Country Performance Practice Ford Foundation Contemporary Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sal Murgiyanto 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sal Murgiyanto

There are no affiliations available

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