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Methods for Microeconometric Risk and Vulnerability Assessment

Chapter

Abstract

The increasing recognition that there are considerable flows into and out of poverty (Baulch and Hoddinott, 2000) has focused interest in household vulnerability as the basis for a social protection strategy. However, the design and implementation of these schemes is hampered by uncertainty over the meaning of this concept. Vulnerability—like risk and love—means different things to different people; there are many definitions of vulnerability and, seemingly, no consensus on its definition or measurement. One might be forgiven for thinking that the discourse on vulnerability is too confused to support initiatives in the areas of policy and interventions.

Keywords

Food Security Poverty Line Vulnerability Assessment Welfare Loss Income Shock 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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