The Futures of Rehabilitation

  • Peter Raynor
  • Gwen Robinson

Abstract

In the last two chapters we have tried to identify some promising approaches to rehabilitative work with offenders. Much of this is tentative, and many initiatives have not worked as well as their proponents hoped, for a variety of reasons, but usually not because the fundamental ideas were unsound. The very mixed results of the Crime Reduction Programme (Hough, 2004; Homel etal., 2005) may feed a resurgence of scepticism and a new wave of ‘nothing works’: the highly sceptical tone of a recent Home Office research review may point in this direction (Harper and Chitty, 2004). To some commentators this might not come as a surprise: they have already warned us that we live in ‘dark times’ (Nellis, 2004); that a combination of public anxiety about crime and loss of confidence in the capacity of governments to control it can feed an escalation of populist ‘toughness’ (Garland, 2001); that the growing private sector in corrections, aided by political enthusiasm for ‘contestability’ and privatisation, has a commercial interest in talking up the problems and escalating the level of coercion (Christie, 1993).

Keywords

Depression Clarification Reformer 

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Copyright information

© Peter Raynor and Gwen Robinson 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Raynor
  • Gwen Robinson

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