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Monetary Institutions and Monetary Theory: Reflections on the History of Monetary Economics

  • Warren J. Samuels
  • Roger Sandilands
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Abstract

Monetary economics is part of the belief system of society. It is also part of the system of social control. And those institutions studied by monetary economists are part of the power structure of society.

Keywords

Interest Rate Monetary Policy Social Control Banking System Belief System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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