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Fathering through Food: Children’s Perceptions of Fathers’ Contributions to Family Food Practices

Chapter
Part of the Studies in Childhood and Youth book series (SCY)

Abstract

A few years ago, the BBC hosted a national competition for amateur chefs. The 2006 Masterchef title went to a man named Peter Bayless who charted his own experience of learning to cook in a book entitled My Father Could Only Boil Cornflakes — a sardonic title which serves to reaffirm Morgan’s observation that the ‘alleged incompetence of men in the kitchen is frequently the subject of considerable humour and right comment’ (1996:159). My Father Could Only Boil Cornflakes both emphasises Bayless’s expertise and implies incompetence in other men, particularly those of a different generation.

Keywords

Food Preparation Domestic Work Domestic Labour Family Meal Food Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Penny Curtis, Allison James, Katie Ellis 2009

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