Advertisement

Interviewing Experts in Political Science: A Reflection on Gender and Policy Effects Based on Secondary Analysis

  • Gabriele Abels
  • Maria Behrens
Part of the Research Methods Series book series (REMES)

Abstract

Unquestionably, German political science draws from a plurality of methods. In comparison to Anglo-Saxon political science, it is for the most part coined less by the “precedence-position of quantitative methodologies and methods hailing from the natural sciences” (Dackweiler, 2004, p. 53; our translation) — simultaneously, it is also characterized by a lack of methodological reflexion. In his 1991 appraisal of qualitative processes Patzelt points out that the practice of empirical political research was once grasped by the “popularity wave known as qualitative analysis” (Patzelt, 1991, p. 53; our translation) and considered herein a faulty approach. Thus, collective statements “ostensible inclinations in regard to categorizing reflection about research methods as irrelevant or to attribute these to Sociology” (ibid.) should be voiced. Interestingly, gender studies in (German) political science are no exemption. Looking at introductory-, text- and handbooks one has to realize how rarely chapters on methods may be found (Dackweiler, 2004, Ebbecke-Nohlen/Nohlen, 1994).

Keywords

Secondary Analysis Company Representative Interview Situation Female Scientist Conversational Situation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Further readings

  1. Bryant, L. and Hoon, E. (2006) “How can the intersections between gender, class, and sexuality be translated to an empirical agenda?” in International Journal of Qualitative Methods 5(1), http://www.ualberta.ca/~iiqm/backissues/5_1/pdf/ bryant. pdf, accessed 14 May 2007.
  2. Corti, L. and Thompson, P. (2004) “Secondary analysis of archive data” in Seale, C., Gobo, G., Gubrium, J. F. and Silverman, D. (eds) Qualitative Research Practice (London: Sage), 327–43.Google Scholar
  3. Sarantakos, S. (2004) Social Research, 3rd edn. (Houndsmill: Palgrave).Google Scholar

References

  1. Abels, G. (2000) Strategische Forschung in den Biowissenschaften. Der Politikprozess zum europäischen Humangenomprogramm (Berlin: Edition Sigma).Google Scholar
  2. Aberbach, J. D., Chesney, J. D. and Rockmann, B. A. (1975) “Exploring elite political attitudes: some methodological lessons” in Political Methodology 2(1), 1–27.Google Scholar
  3. Alemann, U. von (ed.) (1995) Politikwissenschaftliche Methoden. Grundriss für Studium und Forschung (Opladen: estdeutscher Verlag).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Alemann, U. von and Forndran, E. (1990) Methodik der Politikwissenschaft, 4th edn (Stuttgart, Berlin, Köln: Kohlhammer).Google Scholar
  5. Becker-Schmidt, R. (1985) “Probleme einer feministischen Theorie und Empirie in den Sozialwissenschaften” in Feministische Studien 4(2), 93–104.Google Scholar
  6. Behnke, C. and Meuser, M. (1999) Geschlechterforschung und qualitative Methoden (Opladen: Leske & Budrich).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Behnke, J., Baur, N. and Behnke, N. (2006a) Empirische Methoden der Politikwissenschaft (Paderborn, München, Wien, Zürich: Schöningh).Google Scholar
  8. Behnke, J., Gschwend, T., Schindler, D. and Schnapp, K.-U. (eds) (2006b) Methoden der Politikwissenschaft. Neuere qualitative und quantitative Analyseverfahren (Baden-Baden: Nomos).Google Scholar
  9. Behrens, M. (2001) Staaten im Innovationskonflikt. Vergleichende Analyse staatlicher Handlungsspielräume im gentechnischen Innovationsprozess Deutschlands und den Niederlanden (Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang).Google Scholar
  10. Behrens, M. (2003) “Quantitative und qualitative Methoden in der Politikfeldanalyse” in Schubert, K. and Bandelow, N. C. (eds) Lehrbuch der Politikfeldanalyse (München, Wien: Oldenbourg), pp. 205–38.Google Scholar
  11. Behrens, M., Meyer-Stumborg, S. and Simonis, G. (1996) Gentechnik und die Nahrungsmittelindustrie (Opladen: Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften).Google Scholar
  12. Behrens, M., Meyer-Stumborg, S. and Simonis, G. (1997) GenFood: Einführung und Verbreitung, Konflikte und Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten (Berlin: edition sigma).Google Scholar
  13. Behrens, M. and Hennig, E. (2009) “Qualitative Methoden der Internationalen Politik” in Wilhelm, A. and Masala, C. (eds) Handbuch der Internationalen Politik (Wiesbaden: VS Verlag) (forthcoming).Google Scholar
  14. Berg, H. v. d. (2005) “Reanalyzing Qualitative Interviews from Different Angles: The Risk of Decontextualization and Other Problems of Sharing Qualitative Data” in Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung/Forum: Qualitative Social Research 6(1), art. 30, http://www.qualitative-research.net/fqs-texte/1-05/05-1-30-e.htm, date accessed 16 May 2007.
  15. Brosi, W. H., Hembach, K. and Peters, G. (1981) Expertengespräche. Vorgehensweise und Fallstricke. Arbeitspapier des Forschungsprojekts Berufliche Bildung und regionale Entwicklung (Trier: Universität).Google Scholar
  16. Bryant, L. and Hoon, E. (2006) “How can the intersections between gender, class, and sexuality be translated to an empirical agenda?” in International Journal of Qualitative Methods 5(1), http://www.ualberta.ca/~iiqm/backissues/5_1/pdf/ bryant.pdf, date accessed 14 may 2007.
  17. Corti, L. (2000) “Progress and Problems of Preserving and Providing Access to Qualitative Data for Social Research — The International Picture of an Emerging Culture” in Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research 1(3), http://qualitativeresearch.net/fqs/fqs-eng.htm, date accessed 14 May 2007.
  18. Corti, L. and Thompson, P. (2004) “Secondary analysis of archive data” in Seale, C., Gobo, G., Gubrium, J. F. and Silverman, D. (eds) Qualitative Research Practice (London: Sage), pp. 327–43.Google Scholar
  19. Dackweiler, R.-M. (2004) “Wissenschaftskritik — Methodologie — Methoden” in Rosenberger, S. K. and Sauer, B. (eds) Politikwissenschaft und Geschlecht (Wien: UTB-WUV), pp. 45–63.Google Scholar
  20. Dale, A., Arber, S. and Proctor, M. (1988) Doing Secondary Analysis (London: Unwyn Hyman).Google Scholar
  21. Dean, J. P. and Foote Whyte, W. (2006) “How do you know if the informant is telling the truth?” in Dexter, L. A. Elite and Specialized Interviewing (Colchester: ECPR Press), pp. 100–7.Google Scholar
  22. Deeke, A. (1995) “Experteninterviews — ein methodologisches und forschungspraktisches Problem” in Brinkmann, C., Deeke, A. and Völkel, B. (eds) Experteninterviews in der Arbeitsmarktforschung. Diskussionsbeiträge zu methodischen Fragen und praktischen Erfahrungen. Beiträge zur Arbeitsmarkt-und Berufsforschung Nr. 191 (Nürnberg: Bundesanstalt für Arbeit), pp. 7–22.Google Scholar
  23. Dexter, L. A. (1970/2006) Elite and Specialized Interviewing (Colchester: ECPR Press).Google Scholar
  24. Ebbecke-Nohlen, A. and Nohlen, D. (1994) “Feministische Ansätze” in Nohlen, D. (ed.) Lexikon der Politik, vol. 2: Politikwissenschaftliche Methoden (München: Beck), pp. 130–37.Google Scholar
  25. Goodwin, J. and O’Connor, H. (2006) “Contextualising the Research Process: Using Interviewer Notes in the Secondary Analysis of Qualitative Data” in The Qualitative Report 11(2), 374–92.Google Scholar
  26. Gurney, J. N. (1985) “Not one of the guys: The female researcher in a male-dominated setting” in Qualitative Sociology 8(1), 42–62.Google Scholar
  27. Heinzel, F. (1997) “Biographische Methode und wiederholte Gesprächsinteraktion. Ein Verfahren zur Erforschung weiblicher Politisierungsprozesse” in femina politica: Zeitschrift für feministische Politik-Wissenschaft 6(1), 96–104.Google Scholar
  28. Helfferich, C. (2004) Die Qualität qualitativer Daten. Manual für die Durchführung qualitativer Interviews (Wiesbaden: Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Hoffmann-Riem, C. (1980) “Der Datengewinn” in Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie 32, 339–72.Google Scholar
  30. Hucke, J. and Wollmann, H. (1980) “Methodenprobleme der Implementationsforschung” in Mayntz, R. (ed.) Implementation politischer Programme: empirische Forschungsberichte (Königstein/Ts.: Anton Hain), pp. 216–35.Google Scholar
  31. Kacen, L. and Chaitin, J. (2006) “ ‘The Times They are a Changing’: Undertaking Qualitative Research in Ambiguous, Conflictual, and Changing Contexts” in The Qualitative Report 11(2), 209–28.Google Scholar
  32. Kriz, J., Nohlen, D. and Schultze, R.-O. (eds) (1994) Lexikon der Politik, vol. 2: Politikwissenschaftliche Methoden (München: Beck).Google Scholar
  33. Lamnek, S. (1988/1989) Q ualitat ive Sozialfo rschung, vols 1 and 2 (München: Psychologie Verlags Union).Google Scholar
  34. Littig, B. (2005) “Interviews mit Experten und Expertinnen. Überlegungen aus geschlechtertheoretischer Sicht” in Bogner, A., Littig, B. and Menz, W. (eds) Das Experteninterview — Theorie, Methode, Anwendung, 2nd edn (Wiesbaden: Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften), pp. 191–206.Google Scholar
  35. McKee, L. and O’Brien, M. (1983) “Interviewing men: taking gender seriously” in Gamarnikow, E., Morgan, D. H. H., Purvis, J. and Taylerson, D. (eds) The Public and the Private (London: Heinemann), pp. 147–61.Google Scholar
  36. Meuser, M. and Nagel, U. (1991) “Experteninterviews als Instrument zur Erforschung politischen Handelns” in Bering, H., Hitzler, R. and Neckel, S. (eds) Politisches Handeln/ Experteninter views. Dok. Nr. 1 des AK Soziologie politischen Handeln (Bamberg: niversity press), pp. 133–40.Google Scholar
  37. Meuser, M. and Nagel, U. (1994) “Expertenwissen und Experteninterview” in Hitzler, R., Honer, A. and Maeder, C. (eds) Expertenwissen. Die institutionalisierte Kompetenz zur Konstruktion von Wirklichkeit (Opladen: Westdeutscher Verlag), pp. 180–92.Google Scholar
  38. Meuser, M. and Nagel, U. (1997) “Das ExpertInneninterview — Wissenssoziologische Voraussetzungen und methodische Durchführung” in Friebertshäuser, B. and Prengel, A. (eds) Handbuch Qualitative Forschungsmethoden in der Erziehungswissenschaft (Weinheim: Juventa Verlag), pp. 481–91.Google Scholar
  39. Meuser, M. and Nagel, U. (2005) “ExpertInneninterviews — vielfach erprobt, wenig bedacht. Ein Beitrag zur qualitativen Methodendiskussion” in Bogner, A., Littig, B. and Menz, W. (eds) Das Experteninterview — Theorie, Methode, Anwendung, 2nd edn (Wiesbaden: Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften), pp. 71–93.Google Scholar
  40. Padfield, M. and Procter, J. (1996) “The effect of interviewer’s gender on the interviewing process: a comparative enquiry” in Sociology 30(2), 355–66.Google Scholar
  41. Patzelt, W. (1991) “Politikwissenschaft” in Flick, U., Kardorff, E. von, Keupp, H., Rosenstiel, L. von and Wolff, S. (eds) Handbuch Qualitative Sozialforschung (München: Psychologie Verlags Union), pp. 53–5.Google Scholar
  42. Patzelt, W. (1994) “Qualitative Politikforschung” in Kriz, J., Nohlen, D. and Schultze, R.-O. (eds) Lexikon der Politik, vol. 2: Politikwissenschaftliche Methoden (München: Beck), pp. 395–98.Google Scholar
  43. Schendelen, M. P. C. M. van (1984) “Interviewing members of parliament” in Political Methodology, 10(3), 301–21.Google Scholar
  44. Schmid, J. (1995) “Expertenbefragung und Informationsgespräch in der Parteienforschung: Wie föderalistisch ist die CDU?” in Alemann, U. von (ed.) Politikwissenschaftliche Methoden. Grundriss für Studium und Forschung (Opladen: estdeutscher Verlag), pp. 293–26.Google Scholar
  45. Semmel, A. K. (1975) “Deriving perceptual data from foreign policy elites: a methodological narrative” in Political Methodology 2(1), 29–49.Google Scholar
  46. Tietel, E. (2000) “Das Interview als Beziehungsraum” in Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung/Forum: Qualitative Social Research [Online Journal], 1(2), http://qualitative-research.net/fqs/fqs-d/2-00inhalt.htm, accessed 13 May 2007.
  47. Voelzkow, H. (1995) “ ‘Iterative Experteninterviews’: Forschungspraktische Erfahrungen mit einem Erhebungsinstrument” in Brinkmann, C., Deeke, A. and Völkel, B. (eds) Experteninterviews in der Arbeitsmarktforschung. Diskussionsbeiträge zu methodischen Fragen und praktischen Erfahrungen. Beiträge zur Arbeitsmarkt-und Berufsforschung Nr. 191 (Nürnberg: Bundesanstalt für Arbeit), pp. 51–57.Google Scholar
  48. Vogel, B. (1995) “ ‘Wenn der Eisberg zu schmelzen beginnt…’ — Einige Reflexionen über den Stellenwert und die Probleme des Experteninterviews in der Praxis der empirischen Sozialforschung” in Brinkmann, C., Deeke, A. and Völkel, B. (eds) Experteninterviews in der Arbeitsmarktforschung. Diskussionsbeiträge zu methodischen Fragen und praktischen Erfahrungen. Beiträge zur Arbeitsmarkt-und Berufsforschung Nr. 191 (Nürnberg: Bundesanstalt für Arbeit), pp. 73–83.Google Scholar
  49. Ware, A. and Sánchez-Jankowski, M. (2006) “New Introduction” in Dexter, L. A. Elite and Specialized Interviewing (Colchester: ECPR Press), pp. 1–11.Google Scholar
  50. Warren, C. A. B. (1988) Gender Issues in Field Research (London: Sage).Google Scholar
  51. Williams, C. L. and Heikes, E. J. (1993) “The importance of researcher’s gender in the in-depth interview” in Gender and Society 7(2), 280–91.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Gabriele Abels and Maria Behrens 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriele Abels
  • Maria Behrens

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations