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‘That some must suffer for the greater good’: The Post Courier and the 1969 Bougainville Crisis

  • Philip Cass
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of the Media book series (PSHM)

Abstract

This chapter examines the way in which the Post Courier, then Papua New Guinea’s only daily newspaper, covered the emerging crisis on Bougainville in the second half of 1969 as landowners resisted attempts to begin work on the Panguna copper mine. It argues that although the Post Courier’s reporting could be interpreted as favourable towards the mine’s owner, Conzinc Rio Australia; it could also, paradoxically, be interpreted as broadly developmental. The Post Courier’s reporting of the dispute in 1969 hints at the more violent conflicts to come in 1975 and 1990 and reflects the conflict between the need for national unity and national consciousness in a developing nation and micro-nationalist movements.

Keywords

Solomon Island National Unity Daily Newspaper Strip Mining Federal Election 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Philip Cass 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Cass

There are no affiliations available

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