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Markings on the Walls: Writing in Opposition in Alicia Gaspar de Alba’s Desert Blood

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Part of the Comparative Feminist Studies Series book series (CFS)

Abstract

In recent years various cultural productions have been created that attempt to make sense of the violence being perpetrated on the bodies of women in Ciudad Juárez. From films starring U.S. actors like Jennifer Lopez and Minnie Driver, to independently produced documentaries, writers and directors have focused their attention on the murders often referred to as the “maquiladora murders.”1Some of these productions sensationalize the violence, while others are more interested in raising public awareness without necessarily overdramatizing the violence. One of the best received of these productions is Alicia Gaspar de Alba’s Desert Blood.2 The novel, published in 2005, combines research and conjecture in a mystery story that illustrates the complex web of networks at play in the violence occurring in the border city. What distinguishes Gaspar de Alba’s novel from other fictionalized accounts is the ways in which it goes further than simply addressing the violence of the border. Unlike works that offer uncomplicated resolutions, Gaspar de Alba’s novel moves beyond the quest for answers and provides a literary example of an oppositional narrative that demonstrates the opportunities divergent thinking offers in the analysis of transnational systems of power.

Keywords

Border Area North American Free Trade Agreement Border Crosser Story Line Mexican Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Clara Román-Odio and Marta Sierra 2011

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