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The Long Table Model: Bringing Transnational Feminist Debates to a Small Midwestern University

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Part of the Comparative Feminist Studies Series book series (CFS)

Abstract

In a recent edition of College English, Lisa Eck described the challenges students encounter in a global literature course. Initially, students might identify with a figure from another culture, emphasizing the similarities and the universals, as traditional humanism would encourage: “This text is really about you,” as Eck summarizes this perspective (2008, 579). Yet, soon students shift to the comparative/relativistic response: “This text was never about you” (579). Then Eck describes a final shift, informed by the understanding that “the legacy of colonialism is everybody’s business”: “this is also about you” (579). The journeys of Eck’s students through these responses parallel the challenges many students face as they explore global women’s studies and begin to ask questions about power dynamics across national and cultural borders.

Keywords

Female Genital Mutilation Table Model Indigenous Woman Service Project Traditional Humanism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Clara Román-Odio and Marta Sierra 2011

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