Advertisement

Contexts

Chapter
  • 66 Downloads

Abstract

My interest here is to consider a number of texts that significantly determined the development of twentieth-century African American women’s writing. Issues from the accuracy of portraits of black American experience to the establishment of an exceptional literary tradition are evident in the work published particularly in the latter part of the nineteenth century. My focus is not simply on the themes addressed but also on the terms of narrative strategies and how literature and politics are closely linked.

Keywords

Black Woman Black Community Stereotypical Image African American History African American Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans (New York: McGraw Hill, 1994), 250.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    W. E. B. Du Bois, as quoted by Herbert Aptheker in A Documentary History of the Negro People in the United States: From the Reconstruction Era to 1910 (New York: Citadel, 1951), 753Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    Frances Smith Foster, introduction to Iola Leroy, or, Shadows Uplifted, by Frances E. W. Harper (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), xxx-xxxi.Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    Frances E. W. Harper, as quoted by Melba Joyce Boyd in Discarded Legacy: Politics and Poetics in the Life of E. W. Harper, 1825–1911 (Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 1994), 40.Google Scholar
  5. 7.
    Hazel V. Carby, Reconstructing Womanhood: The Emergence of the Afro-American Woman Novelist (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), 66.Google Scholar
  6. 8.
    Frances E. W. Harper, Minnie’s Sacrifice, Sowing and Reaping, Trial and Triumph: Three Rediscovered Novels (Boston: Beacon, 1994), 91.Google Scholar
  7. 19.
    Jacqueline K. Bryant, The Foremother Figure in Early Black WomensLiterature: Clothed in My Right Hand (New York: Garland, 1999), 73.Google Scholar
  8. 21.
    See Frances E. W. Harper, Iola Leroy, or, Shadows Uplifted (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), 97–98.Google Scholar
  9. 24.
    Mary Prince, The History of Mary Prince, A West Indian Slave: Related by Herself in Six Women’s Slave Narratives (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), 11.Google Scholar
  10. 28.
    Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, ed. Henry Louis Gates Jr. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), 6.Google Scholar
  11. 40.
    M. Giulia Fabi, “Reconstructing Literary Genealogies: Frances E. W. Harper’s and William Dean Howells’s Race Novels,” in Soft Canons: American Women Writers and Masculine Tradition, ed. Karen L. Kilcup (Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1999), 60.Google Scholar
  12. 50.
    Benjamin F. Lee, introduction to The Work of Afro-American Women by Gertrude N. F. Mossell (Philadelphia: George S. Ferguson, 1908), 4.Google Scholar
  13. 52.
    Frances E. W. Harper, “Woman’s Political Future,” address in The World’s Congress of Representative Women, ed. May Wright Sewall (Chicago: Rand McNally, 1894), 433–37. Accessed December 17, 2010, http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b3713658.Google Scholar
  14. 54.
    Fannie Barrier Williams, “The Intellectual Progress of the Colored Women of the United States since the Emancipation Proclamation,” address in The World’s Congress of Representative Women, ed. May Wright Sewall (Chicago: Rand McNally, 1894), 696–711. Accessed December 17, 2010, http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b3713659.Google Scholar
  15. 59.
    A. J. Cooper, “Discussion of the Same Subject [The Intellectual Progress of the Colored Women of the United States Since the Emancipation Proclamation],” address in The World’s Congress of Representative Women, ed. May Wright Sewall (Chicago: Rand McNally, 1894), 711–15. Accessed December 17, 2010, http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b3713659.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Ana Nunes 2011

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations