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Securing Africa’s Food Security: Current Constraints and Future Options

  • Daniel D. Karanja
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Abstract

Food is the most basic of human needs for survival, health, and productivity.1It is ironic that though the world is full of great twenty-first-century technological advances and the ability to produce more food than the world needs, yet Africa—a continent with vast and rich natural resources—continues to struggle to provide the basics—including food—to its rapidly increasing population on diminishing amount of quality arable land. Millions of families wake up each day with one idea in mind: how to obtain enough food to stay alive for just another day. This does not have to be the case, when farmers in developed countries—thanks to new technologies—are feeding almost twice as many people with better quality food from virtually the same land base.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Food Security African Country Food Insecurity African Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Jack Mangala 2010

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  • Daniel D. Karanja

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