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Comprehensive Law: Transformative Responses by the Legal Profession

Chapter

Abstract

Conflict has long been associated with the legal profession. Many believe that the main purpose of laws and legal systems is to resolve interpersonal conflict as well as conflict between groups or organizations within society. However, lawyers, particularly in the United States of America, have become frequently associated with the escalation of conflict, as the common perception is that lawyers’ involvement in a conflict will make it much more contentious. Despite the rise of other methods of conflict resolution, such as alternative dispute resolution, mediation, and arbitration, as alternatives to traditional litigation and court adjudication, law and lawyers are still viewed in this light.

Keywords

Procedural Justice Dispute Resolution Restorative Justice Legal Profession Alternative Dispute Resolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

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Resta ra tive Justice

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Related Sites

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Suggested Reading Comprehensive Law Movement

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Legal Profession Generally and New Forms of Law Practice

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Mediation

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Therapeutic Jurisprudence

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Collaborative Law

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  2. This book is authored by a pioneer and trainer in the collaborative law field, speaking primarily to lawyers who wish to become collaborative lawyers.Google Scholar
  3. Tesler, P. H., & Thompson, P. (2007). Collaborative divorce. New York: HarperCollins.Google Scholar
  4. This book is authored by two pioneers and trainers in the collaborative law field, dealing primarily with the interdisciplinary, team-oriented collaborative divorce model of collaborative law.Google Scholar
  5. Webb, S. G., & Ousky, R. D. (2006). How the collaborative divorce method offers less stress, lower cost, and happier kids without going to court: The smart divorce. New York: Hudson Street Press.Google Scholar
  6. This book is coauthored by the founder of collaborative law, Stewart Webb, and is primarily intended to speak to potential clients of collaborative lawyers.Google Scholar

Transformative Mediation

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Preventive Law

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Restorative Justice

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Spirituality and Law

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© Candice C. Carter 2010

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