Amalgame: the Problems of Integration within the Imperial Administration

  • Michael Broers

Abstract

At the pinnacle of the old order, the propensity to rally varied greatly, from state to state, in keeping with their very different traditions. The French had entertained high hopes of the Piedmontese, assuming their militaristic, absolutist traditions would readily dispose them to the Napoleonic order, an assumption based partly on a false vision of the Savoyard past, as emerged when the French had to work with those Piedmontese who did rally. However, dynastic loyalty proved a very powerful check on ralliement in Piedmont, from beginning to end. The loyalty of the elites and masses of the core of the Papal States, outside the Legations and Marches, proved equally tenacious. This was not universally the case, however. Under the early rule of the satraps, particularly, the great families of Florence and Parma proved willing to work with their new masters, just as they had accepted previous changes of dynasty. Initially, the Genoese patricians were more reticent. During annexation, however, more came forward than not, at least once the more moderate Lebrun replaced the former Jacobin, Salicetti. In his first days in Tuscany, Reille, who was virtually the acting French proconsul for a few weeks, found exactly the same. Although most of the ministers he inherited from the Spanish Bourbons appeared ‘old, very slow and barely competent’, he still had ‘a machine set up that I will try to run as well as possible, until further orders’. Beyond the ranks of the administration, he noted:

Keywords

Europe Cage Transportation Assure Assimilation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Michael Broers 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Broers
    • 1
  1. 1.OxfordUK

Personalised recommendations