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Self-Injuring Behavior

  • Yochai Ataria
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter argues that while in certain cases, self-injuring behavior can be considered adaptive, when the self-harmer has a background of severe and prolonged trauma, the self-injuring behavior is based on the mechanism of body-disownership.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yochai Ataria
    • 1
  1. 1.Tel-Hai CollegeUpper GalileeIsrael

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