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The Complex Relations Between SA and SBO During Trauma and the Development of Body-Disownership

  • Yochai Ataria
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the complex relations between the SBO and SA during trauma. It contends that in the presence of a discrepancy between SBO and SA, the individual is unable to function properly and body-disownership may develop.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yochai Ataria
    • 1
  1. 1.Tel-Hai CollegeUpper GalileeIsrael

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