Advertisement

Language Issues Facing Non-Traditional Students: Some Problems and Solutions

  • Megan Bruce
  • Simon Rees
  • Julie Wilson
Chapter
  • 608 Downloads

Abstract

English, as it is used for academic purposes, can present problems for students whose educational background is not of a conventional nature. This chapter explores some common issues faced by students during their foundation year. It highlights some innovative, blended learning approaches used to support the often thorny development of a student’s personal academic voice.

References

  1. Alsop, S., & Nesi, H. (2009). Issues in the development of the British Academic Written English (BAWE) corpus. Corpora, 4(1), 71–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Berkenkotter, C., Hukin, T., & Ackerman, J. (1991). Social context and socially constructed texts: The initiation of a graduate student into a writing research community. In C. Bazerman & J. Paradis (Eds.), Textual dynamics of the professions (pp. 191–215). Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  3. Brinko, K. T. (1993). The practice of giving feedback to improve teaching: What is effective? The Journal of Higher Education, 64(5), 574–593. JSTOR [Online] Available at: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2959994. Accessed 04 April 2013.Google Scholar
  4. Cassels, J., & Johnstone, A. (1983). The meaning of words and the teaching of chemistry. Education in Chemistry, 20, 10–11.Google Scholar
  5. Coxhead, A. (2000). A new academic word list. TESOL Quarterly, 34, 213–238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Drury, H., & Webb, C. (1991). Literacy at tertiary level: Making explicit the writing requirements of a new culture. Paper presented at the Inaugural Systematic Linguistics Conference, Deakin University.Google Scholar
  7. Flowerdew, J. (1993). Concordancing as a tool in course design. System, 21, 231–244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Freedman, A. (1987). Learning to write again: Discipline specific writing at university. Carleton Papers in Applied Language Studies, 4, 45–65.Google Scholar
  9. Gardner, R. P. L. (1972). Words in science. Victoria: Australian Science Education Project.Google Scholar
  10. Hyland, K., & Tse, P. (2007). Is there an academic vocabulary? TESOL Quarterly, 41(2), 235–253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Johns, T. F. (1991). Should you be persuaded: Two examples of data-driven learning. In T. F. Johns & P. King (Eds.), Classroom concordancing (pp. 1–13). Birmingham: ELR.Google Scholar
  12. Johnstone, A. H., & Selepeng, D. (2001). A language problem revisited. Chemistry Education: Research and Practice in Europe, 2, 19–29.Google Scholar
  13. Kenstowicz, M. (1994). Phonology in generative grammar. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  14. Laurillard, D. (2002). Rethinking university teaching. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Mudraya, O. (2006). Engineering English: A lexical frequency instructional model. English for Specific Purposes, 25, 23–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Nathan, P. (2013). Academic writing in the business school: The genre of the business case report. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 12(1), 57–68. Available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1475158512000768. Accessed 01 September 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Nation, I. S. P. (1990). Teaching and Learning Vocabulary. Boston: Heinle & Heinle.Google Scholar
  18. Nation, I. S. P. (2001). Learning vocabulary in another language. New York: CUP.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. November, N., & Day, K. (2012). Using undergraduates’ digital literacy skills to improve their discipline-specific writing: A dialogue. International Journal for the Scholarship of Learning and Teaching, 6(2), 1–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Pickersgill, S., & Lock, R. (1991). Student understanding of selected non‐technical words in science. Research in Science & Technological Education, 9, 71–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Pozo, J., & Lorenzo, M. (2009). Representing organic molecules: The use of chemical languages by university students. In C. Andersen, N. Scheuer, M. P. Perez Echeverria, & T. Ev (Eds.), Representational systems and practices as learning tools. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.Google Scholar
  22. Race, P., & Pickford, R. (2007). Making teaching work. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  23. Ramsden, P. (1992). Learning to teach in higher education. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Rees, S. W., & Bruce, M. (2012). The development of online resources to enhance understanding of subject specific language in non-traditional students. 12th Annual Durham Blackboard Users’ Conference, Durham University, January 2012.Google Scholar
  25. Rincke, K. (2011). It’s rather like learning a language: Development of talk and conceptual understanding in mechanics lessons. International Journal of Science Education, 33, 229–258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Schmitt, D., & Schmitt, N. (2005). Focus on vocabulary: Mastering the academic word list. London: Longman.Google Scholar
  27. Song, Y., & Carheden, S. (2014). Dual meaning vocabulary words (DMW) in learning chemistry. Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 15, 128–141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Sowton, C. (2012). 50 steps to improving your academic writing. Reading: Garnet Education.Google Scholar
  29. Swales, J. M. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Swales, J. M., & Feak, C. B. (2004). Academic writing for graduate students (2nd ed.). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  31. Tribble, C. (1997). Improvising corpora for ELT: Quick-and-dirty ways of developing corpora for language teaching. In J. Melia & B. Lewandowska -Tomaszczyk (Eds.), PALC 1997 proceedings. Lodz: Lodz University Press. Retrieved from http://www.ctribble.co.uk/text/Palc.htm. Accessed 5 February 2013.
  32. Trimble, L. (1985). English for science and technology: A discourse approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Wellington, J. J., & Osborne, J. (2001). Language and literacy in science education. Buckingham: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Wenger, E. C. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning and identity. New York/Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Woodward-Kron, R. (2004). Discourse communities and writing apprenticeship: An investigation of these concepts in undergraduate education students’ writing. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 3, 139–161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Worthington, D., & Nation, I. S. P. (1996). Using texts to sequence the introduction of new vocabulary in an EAP course. RELC Journal, 27(2), 1–11.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Megan Bruce
    • 1
  • Simon Rees
    • 1
  • Julie Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Foundation CentreUniversity of DurhamDurhamUK

Personalised recommendations