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Adjusting Teaching Practices for Mature Adults to Incorporate Understandings of Affective Processes and Self-efficacy in Maths

  • Mary D. Dodd
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Abstract

There is a growing recognition amongst educators and researchers that mathematics, emotion and performance are interrelated. The challenge is to provide opportunities to reduce negative emotions and raise self-efficacy. This chapter highlights the need to view mathematics through the eyes of the student, and it offers examples of practice which have contributed to achieving this.

Keywords

Taster Days General Certificate Of Secondary Education (GCSE) Mather Memorial Foundation Students Online Multiple-choice Tests 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary D. Dodd
    • 1
  1. 1.Foundation CentreUniversity of DurhamDurhamUK

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