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‘Firing for the Hearth’: Storytelling, Landscape and Padraic Colum’s The Big Tree of Bunlahy

  • Pádraic WhyteEmail author
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Part of the Critical Approaches to Children's Literature book series (CRACL)

Abstract

Padraic Colum (1881–1972) was a prolific author of children’s texts, and his writing had an important influence on the development of children’s literature in the early part of the twentieth century. Despite such success, critical engagement with his children’s books is limited. One of Colum’s most sophisticated publications was The Big Tree of Bunlahy: Stories of My Own Countryside (1933), which was cited as a Newbery Honor Book. This essay emphasizes the significance of this neglected text and examines Colum’s intertwining of ideas of landscape and storytelling. It argues that Colum uses various types of landscapes as narrative devices not only to express aspects of the stories told by character-narrators but also to explore ideas of story and storytelling more generally.

Keywords

Prolific Author Liminal Space Irish Culture Implied Reader Frame Narrative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EnglishTrinity College DublinDublinIreland

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