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Instruction with Delight: Evidence of Children as Readers in Eighteenth-Century Ireland from the Collections of Dublin City Library and Archive

  • Máire KennedyEmail author
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Part of the Critical Approaches to Children's Literature book series (CRACL)

Abstract

This essay examines the availability of books for a child audience in eighteenth-century Ireland. It was at this period that children were targeted in the marketing of books, and advertising was aimed specifically at them. The child became a consumer and was in a position to influence what was purchased. Illustration became an important element of books for children. Contacts with English and continental publishers ensured a varied range of books for Irish children. Important publishers, such as John Newbery or William Darton, supplied Irish booksellers. Children’s reading was subject to adult approval, but many authors and educators aimed to combine education with entertainment to interest children. Children found pleasure in their reading and writers have recalled this delight in letters and memoirs.

Keywords

Eighteenth Century Fairy Tale Book Trade Child Audience Childhood Reading 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dublin City Library & ArchiveDublinIreland

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