Study Abroad and Global Citizenship: Paradoxes and Possibilities

Chapter

Abstract

Higher education students are being encouraged to spend time studying in another country because of its reputed benefits. Claims are made about the positive impact of study abroad in developing global citizens, yet the current practice gives rise to several paradoxes. These include: how attempts at cultural adaptation can undermine acceptance of cultural pluralism; how an emphasis on risk management can limit students’ learning potential; and how efforts to increase participation in study abroad may perpetuate global inequities. Some possible strategies are offered to avoid these pitfalls and create strong programs that align with the ideals of global citizenship.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vancouver Island UniversityNanaimoCanada

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