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Eurosceptic Voices: Beyond Party Systems, Across Civil Society

Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in European Political Sociology book series (PSEPS)

Abstract

Research questions emerging from the literature move towards ‘understanding’ Euroscepticism more convincingly (Leconte, Understanding Euroscepticism. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010). However, we still need to investigate Euroscepticism beyond political parties and where and when countries view the lack of success of Eurosceptic parties at the domestic level. This chapter examines public Euroscepticism, as apathy towards politics in general, manifesting itself as an uninterested attitude towards the EU (see Guerra, Central and Eastern European Attitudes in the Face of Union. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), but also in a more emotional dimension of the phenomenon, when the role of the media or contested debates can further trigger anger and anxiety. The analysis addresses the understanding of the phenomenon to suggest further avenues of research.

Keywords

Euroscepticism Public opinion Civil society Crisis Political representation 

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of History, Politics and International RelationsUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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