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Conclusion: Towards New Routes

  • Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon
  • Bettina Malcomess
  • Peter Kankonde
  • Lorena Núñez
Chapter
  • 175 Downloads
Part of the Global Diversities book series (GLODIV)

Abstract

This volume has charted diverse lines of mobility and migration and the ways religion has shaped these, and Johannesburg, in multiple ways. It has explored the sojourns of the living and the dead, the movement of people, ideas and objects, across borders and within city blocks. It has explored the ways in which spirits are experienced as incarnated not only in sacred spaces but also in the banality and tumult of everyday life.

Keywords

Sexual Minority Religious Group Gated Community Constitutional Protection Evangelical Church 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon
    • 1
  • Bettina Malcomess
    • 2
  • Peter Kankonde
    • 3
    • 4
  • Lorena Núñez
    • 5
  1. 1.African Centre for Migration & SocietyUniversity of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.Wits School of ArtsJohannesburgSouth Africa
  3. 3.Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic DiversityGöttingenGermany
  4. 4.African Centre for Migration and Society (ACMS)University of WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  5. 5.Department of SociologyUniversity of the Witwatersrand (WITS)JohannesburgSouth Africa

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