The Attempted Trilateral EU, China, Africa Development Dialogue

  • Anna Katharina Stahl
Chapter
Part of the The European Union in International Affairs book series (EUIA)

Abstract

Chapter 5 presents the third empirical case study of the book. It draws attention to the EU’s trilateral development initiative with China and Africa. It focuses specifically on the EU’s foreign policy towards the African continent and the development of the bilateral EU-Africa Strategic Partnership. Moreover, it offers a definition of the concept of triangular or trilateral development cooperation.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Katharina Stahl
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EuropeBrugesBelgium

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