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Conclusions

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Abstract

This chapter, Conclusions, summarizes the major arguments of the book. It reviews very succinctly the earlier chapters and draws conclusions as to perceptions of the recipient countries/non-dominant forces concerning the exercise of power in the specific context of development finance, especially of the rural areas. It highlights the fact that substantial cumulative financial assistance from any one country can give that donor significant “power over” the recipient country. It also looks at how recipient countries can package their development assistance to ensure optimum returns. It also looks at whether such a packaging is possible. The final chapter also addresses the issue of strategy, which could be developed ex ante by the recipient countries using lessons learned as guiding principles.

Keywords

External Force African Country Development Finance Recipient Country Exclusive Economic Zone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes and References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.African Development BankTunis-BelvedereTunisia

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