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Abundance and Scarcity: Christian Economic Thought

  • Ayman Reda
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Islamic Banking, Finance, and Economics book series (IBFE)

Abstract

This chapter explores the rich tradition of Christian economic thought on the subject of scarcity and abundance. This tradition includes the scripture of the Old and New Testaments, the writings of the early Church Fathers and the medieval Scholastics, the modern Papal encyclicals, and the opinions of contemporary Christian theologians and economists. The predominant Christian position on the subject is largely derivative of the concept of stewardship, and its implications with respect to property and freedom.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ayman Reda
    • 1
  1. 1.EconomicsThe University of Michigan - DearbornDearbornUSA

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