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Teaching Our Teachers: Trans* and Gender Education in Teacher Preparation and Professional Development

  • Cathy A. R. Brant
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Part of the Queer Studies and Education book series (QSTED)

Abstract

With a book focusing on teaching and affirming trans* and gender creative youth, it is critical to discuss not only the experiences of these students in schools and specific practices teachers can employ to make school spaces more inclusive for trans* and gender non-conforming students, but to also include a discussion on the preparation of teachers to work with this population. Brant presents the data from two studies measuring preservice and inservice teachers’ perceived self-efficacy in working with and working for trans* and gender creative youth. From this data she makes recommendations about the ways in which teacher educators can apply a Queer Literacy Framework as a part of a teacher preparation program.

Keywords

Gender Creative Teacher Preparation Classroom Gender Expression Gender Nonconforming Students Pre-service Teachers 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2016

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathy A. R. Brant
    • 1
  1. 1.University of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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