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The Making of Personhood

  • Cathrine Degnen
Chapter

Abstract

Who and what counts as a person? How do we know? When is personhood attributed? To what extent does place shape personhood? Can personhood be “lost”? Is personhood only for the living or is it a question for the dead too? These are key questions of this monograph, introduced here and set in the broader context of the study of personhood in anthropology. This chapter argues that whilst answers to these questions of personhood vary cross-culturally, they also demand ethnographic attention across the life course, examining how personhood is intrinsically connected to—and can change with—various phases of life. As well as addressing the multiple challenges of such an undertaking, the chapter also outlines the relational, processual approach taken in this book.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathrine Degnen
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Geography, Politics & SociologyNewcastle UniversityNewcastle upon TyneUK

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