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Subversive Imagination: Smoothing Space for Leisure, Identity, and Politics

  • Brian E. Kumm
  • Corey W. Johnson
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter offers an exploration of the dynamics and interrelationships of leisure, identity, and politics in a conceptual framework of spatiality, territoriality, and becoming. Taking the work of Deleuze and Guattari (Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and schizophrenia, 2009, A thousand plateaus: Capitalism and schizophrenia, 2011) as our guiding philosophical and theoretical orientation, we attempt to provoke a subversive imagination coupled with a pragmatics useful for thinking, feeling, and living differently within our contemporary, late capitalist moment where social, economic, and political powers tend to impinge and subordinate movement toward justice, equality, and equity. Urging geopolitical understandings of identity and encouraging cartographic practices of leisure inquiry, we call for active engagement to smooth the striated space of leisure to engender greater diversity, equity, and justice. Ultimately, this chapter introduces concepts we deem sufficiently forceful, imaginative, and subversive to challenge common conceptions of leisure, identity, and politics and break open possibilities for greater variegation and diversity in how leisure scholarship approaches these concerns.

Keywords

Deleuze Spatiality Smooth space Striated space Becoming Leisure Identity Politics 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian E. Kumm
    • 1
  • Corey W. Johnson
    • 2
  1. 1.2049 Health Science Center, University of Wisconsin – La CrosseMadisonUSA
  2. 2.University of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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