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Thinking Through Post-structuralism in Leisure Studies: A Detour Around “Proper” Humanist Knowledges

  • Lisbeth A. Berbary
Chapter

Abstract

Similar to any paradigm of thought, humanism has its limitations and should be met with suspicion (St. Pierre, Int J Qual Stud Educ 13(5):477–515, 2000). Scholars in our field have already taken up this call to question humanism by showing its limits and making space for more critical humanist theories (Parry et al., Leisure Sci 35(1):81–87, 2013). However, such critiques tend to remain with/in critical theory, feminism(s), and critical race theories, rather than stepping outside of humanism into post* theories such as post-structuralism, queer theory, and post-humanism. Recognizing the usefulness of engaging in a pluralism of theories to understand, critique, and deconstruct leisure phenomena, this chapter encourages scholars to consider stepping outside of humanism to show the strength of also employing post* theories in our theorizing and qualitative leisure research.

Keywords

Social theory Post* paradigms Deconstruction Ethics 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisbeth A. Berbary
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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