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John Locke: Recreation, Morality and Paternalism in Leisure Policy

  • Ian Lamond
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Abstract

Using key texts written by John Locke, this chapter considers the historical foundations of the association between leisure and morality that can be found in his work. As well as considering the historical foundations of his ideas, particularly their connection to the epistemology of Plato and Aristotle, this chapter also considers the relationship between Locke’s principles of moral education and his political theory. As well as Locke’s political theory being seen as highly influential in liberalist political philosophy, both in earlier incarnations and its more contemporary articulation as neo-liberalism, it is argued that his associated thinking around recreation and moral development have also been influential. That is especially the case in paternalistic approaches to leisure policy and the discourses commonly associated with the dominant imaginary of commodified leisure discernable in current hegemonic neo-liberalism.

Keywords

Aristotle Elitism Empiricism Ethics Neo-liberalism Plato Victorian liberalism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Lamond
    • 1
  1. 1.Leeds Beckett UniversityLeedsUK

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